Esophageal astresis: what exactly is it?

Esophageal atresia is a birth defect in which part of a baby's esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach) does not develop properly.
Esophageal atresia is a birth defect of the swallowing tube (esophagus) that connects the mouth to the stomach. In a baby with esophageal atresia, the esophagus has two separate sections, the upper part and the lower part of the esophagus, that are not connected. A baby with this birth defect is unable to pass food from the mouth to the stomach, and sometimes has difficulty breathing.
Esophageal atresia often occurs with a tracheoesophageal fistula, a birth defect in which part of the esophagus is connected to the trachea.

The different types of esophageal atresia

There are four types of esophageal atresia: Type A, Type B, Type C, and Type D.
- Type A is when the upper and lower parts of the esophagus are not connected and have closed ends. In this type, no part of the esophagus attaches to the trachea.
- Type B is very rare. In this type, the upper part of the esophagus is attached to the trachea, but the lower part of the esophagus has a closed end.
- Type C is the most common type. In this type, the upper part of the esophagus has a closed end and the lower part of the esophagus is attached to the trachea, as shown in the drawing.
- Type D is the rarest and most severe. In this type, the upper and lower parts of the esophagus are not connected to each other, but each is connected separately to the trachea.

Causes of esophageal atresia

The causes of esophageal atresia in most babies are unknown. Researchers believe that some cases of esophageal atresia may be caused by abnormalities in the baby's genes. Nearly half of all babies born with esophageal atresia have one or more additional birth defects, such as other problems with the digestive system (intestines and anus), heart, kidneys, ribs or spine.
Certain factors such as the advanced age of the mother or father may increase the risk of having a baby with esophageal atresia. Women who have used APT to become pregnant are at increased risk of having a baby with esophageal atresia.
If you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, talk to your doctor about ways to increase your chances of having a healthy baby.

How to diagnose this anomaly?

Esophageal atresia is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy. Esophageal atresia is most often detected after birth, when the baby first tries to feed and chokes or vomits, or when a tube inserted into the baby's nose or mouth cannot pass into his stomach. An x-ray can confirm that the tube stops in the upper part of the esophagus.

Is there a treatment?

Once diagnosed, surgery is needed to reconnect both ends of the esophagus so the baby can breathe and suck properly. Multiple surgeries and other procedures or medications may be needed, especially if the baby's repaired esophagus becomes too narrow for food to pass through if the muscles in the esophagus are not working well enough to move food through the esophagus. stomach or if digested food systematically goes up the esophagus Today's advice: browse this file induction cooker before acquiring it!